upcoming events

Collegium Spinozanum II

An International Summer School on Spinoza and Spinozisms in Their Historical and Philosophical Context

University of Groningen

Full details: http://www.rug.nl/education/summer-winter-schools/summer_schools_2017/collegium-spinozanum/

Dates
4 – 7 July 2017
Deadline call for papers: 20 April 2017
Deadline for registration: 1 June 2017
Level
BA, MA, PhD, Post-Doc (staff)
Coordinator
Andrea Sangiacomo
Fee
PhDs and Post-doc (or staff): 150
Undergraduate students: 100
Bachelor students: 50
Housing (optional):
235 (6 nights)
Spinoza

Built on the success of the previous 2015 edition, the Groningen Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Thought is pleased to announce the second edition of the Collegium Spinozanum, which will take place at the Faculty of Philosophy at the University of Groningen from 4 to 7 July 2017.

This Summer School aims to bring together advanced students and established scholars working broadly on Spinoza’s thought, sources and reception. The goal of the Summer School is to create an international forum to stimulate scholarly exchange and conversations inspired by different approaches and methodologies.

During morning sessions, established scholars in several different areas of Spinoza studies will offer seminars on some of the frontier research topics in the field. Afternoon sessions will consist of discussions of selected papers presented by participants and reading groups on short texts belonging to Spinoza’s works, or significant for the reception of Spinoza’s philosophy.

Scholarships and fee waivers are available.

Julie Klein at London Spinoza Circle

Julie Klein (Villanova University) will speak on “Language, Reason,and Intellect in Spinoza” on Friday 10th March, 2 – 4pm (Note change of time).

Dreyfus Room, via  26 Russell Square, Birkbeck College, London WC1B 5DT. The Dreyfus Room is on the top floor of the adjacent building.

“In this paper, I review Spinoza’s critique of language to show that he thinks words are inadequate for, and may even render us unable to pursue, scientia intuitiva.  Coming to terms with Spinoza’s division between language and intellection brings us face to face with a position that separates him from many recent thinkers: he does not take the linguistic turn.  Spinoza’s critique of language also raises a difficult question for us as readers: If words are inapt for intellectual knowing, what is the point of a text like the Ethics?  The TTP offers us three models of texts: Scripture, Euclid’s Elements, and “the true original text of Scripture,” which Spinoza identifies with the human mind.  I argue that the text of the Ethics is not Spinoza’s “philosophy” but rather points us toward it.  As linguistic and as rational, the Ethics offers cognitive training to strengthen the mind’s power of inference, but it does not present knowledge of the third kind.  This, I argue, is the sense of Spinoza’s claim in Ethics 5p28 that a striving or desire for the third kind of knowing can arise from the second kind of knowing and not the first.  In the final section of the paper, I explore the differences between the second and third kinds of knowing and focus on the break between the former and the latter.  I argue, ultimately, that the third kind of knowing is distinguished by its immediacy, which radically exceeds both the first and second kinds of knowing.”

The Arts of Spinoza: extended deadline

EXTENDED DEADLINE for submissions for “The Arts of Spinoza + Pacific Spinoza” conference, Auckland, 26-28 May 2017:

Abstracts will now be accepted up to Tuesday 14 February, midnight NZST. Send to pacificspinoza@gmail.com. Abstracts submitted by this date will receive a decision around the second half of March or sooner. (Those who have already submitted abstracts, thank you — decisions will be sent out for these by late February or latest early March.)

Full details at: http://interstices.ac.nz/call-for-papers-spinoza-auckland-2017/

Oxford Seminar in Early Modern Philosophy

Oxford Seminar in Early Modern Philosophy: Philosophy of/and Education

Mon 13-Tues 14 March, 2017

Mansfield College

Oxford, OX1 3TF

 

Attendance is free and all are welcome, but we ask that you register by emailing: paul.lodge@mansfield.ox.ac.uk

In addition, there is a conference dinner (£25) on Mon 13th, for which registration and prepayment is required.

 

Monday March 13

9.00-9.30 – Registration and coffee

9.30-10.30 ‘Spinozan Pedagogy.’  Julie Klein (Villanova University)

10.30-11.30  ‘Locke on Habit and Experience in the Formation of the Self.’ Anik Waldow (University of Sydney)

11.30-12.00 – Break

12.00-1.00 ‘Domesticating Descartes: Johann Clauberg’s Scholasticization of the New Science.’  Nabeel Hamid (University of Pennsylvania)

1.00-2.30 – LUNCH

2.30-3.30  ‘Adam Smith’s Remarks on Education.’  Anna Markwart (Nicolaus Copernicus University in Toruń)

3.30-4.30 ‘Music as Moral Authenticity: Reinstating the Role of Music in Rousseau’s Philosophy of Education.’ Valerie Kuzmina (University of Ottawa)

4.30-5.00 – Break

5.00-6.00 ‘Emilie Du Châtelet on Education and Women’s Minds.’ Karen Detlefsen (University of Pennsylvania)

 

Tuesday March 14

9.00-9.30 — Coffee

9.30-10.30 ‘Going to School with Luther: 18th–Century German Philosophical Conceptions of the Modern University and Their Lutheran Heritage.’ Lim Lung Chieh (University of Ottawa)

10.30-11.30 ‘The Socratic Pedagogy of Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz.’ Sergio A. Gallegos (Metropolitan St. University of Denver) & Adriana Clavel (University of Sheffield)

11.30-12.00 – Break

12.00-1.00 ‘”For the Want Whereof This Nation Perishes”: John Milton on Education.’ Teresa Bejan (University of Oxford)

Lunch – 1.00-2.30

2.30-3.30 ‘Shifting Epistemic Authority and the Role of Education.’ Lisa Shapiro (Simon Fraser University)

Spinoza Colloquium, Leipzig

Spinoza Colloquium Leipzig

Friday February 17th, 2017, 2 to 8 pm

Whoever happens to be in the area: At Leipzig University there will be a fifth session of the Spinoza Colloquium. This activity is a cooperative project between the political science department at Leipzig and the philosophy department at Halle-Wittenberg (and with support from the German Spinoza Society).

This event will again take place at the Institut für Politikwissenschaft, Geisteswissenschaftliches Zentrum (GWZ), Beethovenstraße 15, 04107 Leipzig, room 4.1.16.

There will be three talks:

Dr. Kerstin Andermann (Lüneburg): „Spinozas Theorie der Gemeinbegriffe“
Marion Blancher (Lyon): “Individual Freedom and Common Freedom in the Political Theory of Spinoza”
Prof. Katja Diefenbach (Stuttgart/Berlin): „Spinoza oder Descartes? Die Kontroverse zwischen Ferdinand Alquié und Martial Gueroult und ihre Nachwirkungen in der poststrukturalistischen Philosophie“

For more info go to: http://www.sozphil.uni-leipzig.de/cm/powi/martin-saar/

Contact: Martin Saar martin.saar@uni-leipzig.de

Scottish Seminar in Early Modern Philosophy VIII (SSEMP VIII)

University of Edinburgh 10-11 April 2017

Project Room, room 1.06, William Robertson Building
University of Edinburgh, 50 George Square
Edinburgh, EH8 9LH

Key note speakers:
Beth Lord
(University of Aberdeen)
Peter Millican (Oxford University)

Full programme available here

Attendance is free, but registration is required.

Contact: Mogens Lærke: mogenslaerke@hotmail.com

Organisation: Pauline Phemister (Edinburgh), Mogens Lærke (IHRIM, CNRS, ENS de Lyon)

Funding: Scottish Philosophical Association (SPA) / British Society for the History of Philosophy (BSHP)/ Edinburgh University / IHRIM (CNRS, UMR 5317), ENS de Lyon.

Spinoza Circle meeting (London)

For the next meeting of the London Spinoza Circle, we are pleased to have Eric Schliesser (University of Amsterdam) who will speak on “Spinoza and 18th Century Anti-mathematicism.”

3pm – 5pm, Wednesday 25th January 2017 at

Birkbeck, University of London, School of Arts, Room B02, 43 Gordon Square, Kings Cross, London WC1H 0PD.

In this presentation, I identify and articulate three different kinds of critical attitudes toward the epistemic status and application of mathematics that were developed in the eighteenth century. Somewhat surprisingly, I suggest that all three of these can be found in the works of Spinoza and, paradoxically, were further developed in light of Spinoza’s own reliance on a geometric mode of presentation. In addition to the writings of Spinoza, I pay particular attention to works by Mandeville, Hume, and Buffon.

 The following meeting of the London Spinoza Circle will be on Friday 10th March, 3pm – 5pm when Julie Klein (Villanova University) will speak on “Language, Reason, and Intellect in Spinoza” (location to be confirmed).

.

Seminar: “Meeting Spinoza”

Seminar: ‘Meeting Spinoza: Books, Letters, Networks, Personal Encounters’

Date: October 5-6, 2017

Location: Utrecht, The Netherlands

Confirmed invited speakers: Mogens Laerke (CNRS Lyon), Steven Nadler (Madison-Wisconsin), Antonella del Prete (Tuscia University)

Prospectus

While the old model of Spinoza as a recluse who developed a complete philosophical system in near isolation may no longer dominate scholarship as it once did, the full depth of his interaction with others remains largely unexplored. The seminar ‘Meeting Spinoza: Books, Letters, Networks, Personal Encounters’ seeks to fill this historiographical gap by bringing Spinoza specialists together with other early modern scholars who encounter him through the eyes of the historical figures at the basis of their own research. With the notion of ‘meeting’ in the main title we understand direct engagement with Spinoza during his own lifetime. Nevertheless, as the subtitle conveys, the modality of these meetings may be understood in a wide variety of ways. Papers may therefore consider the reception of Spinoza’s writings, either as they circulated in manuscript form or immediately upon their publication. They may seek to solve specific issues relating to Spinoza’s correspondence, or investigate patterns in his letter writing. We also encourage contributions on the networks in which Spinoza participated, ranging from the Jewish surroundings in which he was raised, to his ambivalent relationship with the Dutch Cartesians, and everything in between, such as the Dutch Collegiant community of his merchant years or even the prominent number of physicians figuring among his associates. A final, related area of interest is constituted by those contemporaries who are known to have met Spinoza in person. This category includes the famous meetings with Henry Oldenburg and Leibniz, but our interest extends also to chance or one-time encounters with lesser known figures, such as the Leiden theologian Salomon van Til. Papers should aim to contribute to our understanding of the man Spinoza, the development of his thought, and the response it evoked, all within the dynamics of the world in which he participated.

Abstracts

Anonymized abstracts (300-500 words) should be sent as a .docx file to Albert Gootjes (a.j.gootjes@uu.nl) by March 15, 2017; please include a separate attachment with contact information, affiliation, and professional status. Applicants will be notified of the committee’s decision by April 15, 2017.

Limited funds are available to cover travel and/or accommodations for presenters who receive no financial support from their institution. Please indicate in your cover letter if you would like to be considered for such a subsidy.

‘Spinoza’s Web’

This seminar is part of the ‘Spinoza’s Web’-projected directed by prof. dr. Piet Steenbakkers, and funded by the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO).

Organisers: Piet Steenbakkers, Jeroen van de Ven, Albert Gootjes