Author: spinozaresearchnetwork

New critical edition of Ethica

A new Latin and French critical edition of Ethica has been published and is now available.

Spinoza, Œuvres IV: Ethica/Éthique. Texte établi par Fokke Akkerman et Piet Steenbakkers, traduction par Pierre-François Moreau, introduction et notes par Pierre-François Moreau et Piet Steenbakkers, avec annexes par Fabrice Audié, André Charrak et Pierre-François Moreau. Paris: Presses Universitaires de France, 2020. ISBN 978-2-13-081149-7, 696 pages, €32.

https://www.puf.com/content/%C5%92uvres_IV_-_%C3%89thique_0

The Latin text is based on Spinoza’s Opera posthuma of 1677, which has been collated systematically with the 1677 Dutch version in De nagelate schriften and with the Vatican manuscript (copied from Spinoza’s completed autograph between November 1674 and May 1675, but only discovered in 2010). It is accompanied by a scrupulous new translation. The introduction examines the textual history of the work from its genesis to recent editions and translations, and presents an account of the constitution of the Latin text and of the principles governing the French translation. Historical, lexical and conceptual clarifications are offered in the notes. Three appendices deal with the geometric examples, the excursion on the nature of bodies, and the structure of the theory of the affects. The book is completed by a glossary, a bibliography and an index of names.

An e-book version will be available before long.

Sanders Prize in the History of Early Modern Philosophy

The editor of Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy is pleased to announce that submissions are now being received for the third Sanders Prize in the History of Early Modern Philosophy. The Sanders Prize in the History of Early Modern Philosophy is a biennial essay competition open to scholars who are within fifteen (15) years of receiving a Ph.D. or students who are currently enrolled in a graduate program. Independent scholars may also be eligible, and should direct inquiries to Donald Rutherford, editor of Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy at drutherford@ucsd.edu<mailto:drutherford@ucsd.edu>.

The award for the prizewinning essay is $5,000. Winning essays will be published in Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy. This year’s deadline is October 1, 2020.

For more details on submissions, see: http://www.marcsandersfoundation.org/sanders-prizes/early-modern-philosophy/

CfA: UPenn virtual seminar in early modern philosophy

*Call for Abstracts*

In an effort to encourage philosophical engagement during the COVID-19 pandemic, we invite submissions from graduate students for University of Pennsylvania’s virtual seminar in Early Modern Philosophy. The seminar will be conducted in English, and we encourage papers on any topic in 17th- and 18th-century European philosophy. The seminar will take place synchronously in Eastern Daylight Time.

Abstracts should be between 500-750 words. Please submit your abstract in .pdf format, prepared for anonymous review, to upennearlymodernconference@gmail.com. In the body of the email, please include your name, university affiliation, paper title, and the time zone you anticipate being in during August 2020. Papers should be suitable for a 25-minute presentation (between 3,000-3,500 words) and 20-minute Q&A. Our aim is to have comments presented following each presentation. So, we ask that if your abstract is accepted, the paper should be completed three weeks before the seminar so we can send it to the assigned commentator.

 

*Submission Deadline: May 22, 2020*

Decision Deadline: May 30, 2020

Paper Completion Deadline: July 15, 2020 Comment Completion Deadline: July 29, 2020 *Date of Seminar: August 5-6, 2020*

 

Keynote Speakers:

Omri Boehm (New School)

Yitzhak Melamed (Johns Hopkins)

 

Organizers:

John Roman (University of Pennsylvania)

Tyler Re (University of Pennsylvania)

Zachary Agoff (University of Pennsylvania) Karen Detlefsen (University of Pennsylvania)

 

Contact: upennearlymodernconference@gmail.com

Special issue on Spinoza and Art

A special issue of Intellectual History Review, edited by Moira Gatens and Anthony Uhlmann, on Spinoza and Art has just been published online.

The full special issue can be accessed here (institutional login required). The editors’ Preface is open access and can be accessed here.

Intellectual History Review, Vol. 30 Issue 3 (2020): Spinoza and Art

Moira Gatens and Anthony Uhlmann: Preface to the special issue

Joe Hughes: The greatest deception: fiction, falsity, and manifestation in Spinoza’s Metaphysical Thoughts

Jonathan Israel: Spinoza, Radical Enlightenment, and the general reform of the arts in the later Dutch Golden Age

Warren Montag: Spinoza’s counter-aesthetics

Anthony Uhlmann and Moira Gatens: Spinoza on art and the cultivation of a disposition toward joyful living

Sara Hornak: Intersections between philosophy and art: expressions of immanence in the seventeenth century: Spinoza and Vermeer

Amy Cimini: We don’t know that we don’t know what a body can do…, or Spinoza and some social lives of sonic material

Beth Lord: Spinoza and architectural thinking

Susan Ruddick: Against a fatal confusion: Spinoza, climate crisis, and the weave of the world

 

 

 

Special issue on Arendt and Spinoza

New special issue on the role of the exemplar in Arendt and Spinoza in Ethics and Education

https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/ceae20/15/2?nav=tocList

Title: “The Role of the Exemplar in Arendt and Spinoza: Insights for Moral Exemplarism and Moral Education”

Guest editors: Johan Dahlbeck and Morten Timmermann Korsgaard

Table of contents:

Introduction: the role of the exemplar in Arendt and Spinoza: insights for moral exemplarism and moral education – Johan Dahlbeck & Morten Timmermann Korsgaard

Paths to flourishing: ancient models of the exemplary life – Maria Silvia Vaccarezza

Politics as a model of pedagogy in Spinoza – Justin Steinberg

Arendt’s Krisis – Steven DeCaroli

Moral exemplars in education: a liberal account – Michel Croce

Singularity, similarity, and exemplarity in Spinoza’s philosophy – Moira Gatens

Between horror and boredom: fairy tales and moral education – David Lewin

Spinoza’s Ethics of ratio: discovering and applying a spinozan model of human nature – Heidi M. Ravven

Visiting exemplars: An Arendtian exploration of educational judgement – Morten Timmermann Korsgaard

The moral fallibility of Spinoza’s exemplars: exploring the educational value of imperfect models of human behavior – Johan Dahlbeck & Moa De Lucia Dahlbeck

 

New site: the Deleuze Seminars

This exciting new project from Purdue University, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Bibliothèque nationale de France includes English translations of some of Deleuze’s Spinoza seminars. Read on for more info!

 

The Deleuze Seminars

We are delighted to announce the virtual launch of a new archive site, The Deleuze Seminars (deleuze.cla.purdue.edu <http://deleuze.cla.purdue.edu/>), devoted to the work of the French philosopher Gilles Deleuze (1925-1995). The site has several goals:

— To provide English translations and French transcriptions, many newly developed for the site, of the seminar lectures Deleuze gave at the University of Paris, Vincennes-St. Denis, between 1971 and 1987.

— To provide additional documents — course notes, lectures, video links, and interviews — that complement the formal course lectures.

— To provide a location for ongoing data rescue. Most of Deleuze’s seminars were recorded by his students, yet very few recordings from the 1970s have been archived, or even survived, and some gaps remain for the 1980 seminars. The Deleuze Seminars is hosting a data rescue effort to retrieve and save as many of these recordings as possible.

We welcome you to explore the resources available at the The Deleuze Seminars by visiting deleuze.cla.purdue.edu <http://deleuze.cla.purdue.edu/>. The site includes new English translations (and many new French transcriptions) and already several of Deleuze’s complete seminars on Foucault (1985-86) and Leibniz (1980, 1986-87), with several other seminars currently in development. For queries about the archive or to discuss possible rescue of extant data, please contact thedeleuzeseminars@gmail.com <mailto:thedeleuzeseminars@gmail.com>.

The Deleuze Seminars site is an ongoing project that has been undertaken with support from Purdue University, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and in collaboration with the Bibliothèque nationale de France (gallica.bnf.fr/conseils/content/gilles-deleuze <https://gallica.bnf.fr/conseils/content/gilles-deleuze>), the Université de Paris 8 (www2.univ-paris8.fr/deleuze <http://www2.univ-paris8.fr/deleuze>) and Web Deleuze (www.webdeleuze.com <http://www.webdeleuze.com/>).

Spinoza and ‘no platforming’ – from The Conversation

Spinoza and ‘no platforming’: Enlightenment thinker would have seen it as motivated by ambition rather than fear

Baruch Spinoza, one of the great rationalists of 17th-century philosophy.
Unknown artist via Wikimedia Commons

Beth Lord, University of Aberdeen and Alexander Douglas, University of St Andrews

The recent “no-platforming” of social historian Selina Todd and former Conservative MP Amber Rudd has reignited the debate about protecting free speech in universities. Both had their invited lectures cancelled at the last minute on the grounds of previous public statements with which the organisers disagreed.

Many people have interpreted these acts as hostile behaviour aimed at silencing certain views. But is this primarily about free speech?

The debate about no-platforming and “cancel culture” has largely revolved around free speech and the question of whether it is ever right to deny it. The suggestion is that those who cancel such events want to deny the freedom of speech of individuals who they take to be objectionable.

Most of us surely agree that freedom of speech should sometimes be secondary to considerations of the harm caused by certain forms of speech – so the question is about what kinds of harm offer a legitimate reason to deny someone a public platform. Since people perceive harm in many different ways, this question is particularly difficult to resolve.

But perhaps the organisers who cancelled these events were not motivated by the desire to deny freedom of speech at all. Todd and Rudd are prominent people in positions of authority – so cancelling their events, while causing a public splash, is unlikely to dent their freedom to speak on these or other issues at other times and in different forums.




Read more:
Two arguments to help decide whether to ‘cancel’ someone and their work


But these acts have a significant effect on others, who may feel unable to speak on certain issues from fear of similar treatment. Perhaps the no-platformers cancelled Todd and Rudd, not because they wanted to deny them their freedom to speak, but because they didn’t want to listen to them. Perhaps they were motivated not by a rational consideration of potential harm, but by an emotion: the desire not to listen to something with which they disagree.

Ambitious mind

The 17th-century Dutch philosopher Baruch Spinoza has a name for this emotion: ambition. Nowadays we think of ambition as the desire to succeed in one’s career. But in the 17th century, ambition was recognised to be a far more pernicious – and far more political – emotion. As Spinoza wrote in his Ethics (1677), ambition is the desire that everyone should feel the way I do:

Each of us strives, so far as he can, that everyone should love what he loves, and hate what he hates… Each of us, by his nature, wants the others to live according to his temperament; when all alike want this, they are alike an obstacle to one another.

Spinoza sees the emotions, or “passions”, as naturally arising from our interactions with one another and the world. We strive to do things that make us feel joy – an increase in our power to exist and flourish – and we strive to avoid things that make us feel sad or cause a decrease in our power.

Handwritten manuscript of ‘Ethica’ by Baruch de Spinoza.
Biblioteca Vaticana

We naturally desire and love what we believe others desire and love. It is therefore natural that we want others to love what we do and think what we think. For if others admire and approve of our actions and feelings, then we will feel a greater pleasure – with a concomitant increase of power – in ourselves.

Ambition is not simply wanting to feel esteemed – it is wanting others to love and hate exactly what we love and hate. It is the desire to cause others to think and feel exactly as we do. It is the desire to “avert from ourselves” those who cannot be convinced to do so – for those dissenters diminish our sense of self-worth.

Disagreement a threat

Spinoza would have recognised the desire not to listen to dissenting views as a species of ambition. Disagreement is perceived not as a reasoned difference of views, but as a threat: something that causes sadness and a diminishing of one’s power – something to be avoided at all costs.

Somebody who feels differently threatens our sense of the worthiness of our own feelings, causing a type of sadness. Spinoza stresses that we strive to “destroy” whatever we imagine will lead to sadness. Thus ambition leads to a desire to change people’s views, often through hostile, exclusionary, destructive behaviours.

Not only that, but someone in the grip of ambition is likely to be immune to rational argument. Spinoza argues that passions are obstructive to good thinking: reason – on its own – has little power to shift a passion that has a strong hold on us.

Most of us have had negative experiences on social media with people who disagree with us on politically charged questions. Instead of engaging with our arguments, they point out that we are immoral or unfeeling for holding a different view. Really, what our opponents find intolerable is our failure to feel the same about the issue as they do.

Refusing to hear an argument and seeking to silence it is a mild form of no-platforming, motivated not by the desire to quash free speech, but by ambition. Our failure to share in the political feelings of others leads them to experience a loss of power, and they respond by attacking the cause of the loss. Ambition makes rational debate impossible, even when our freedom to speak remains perfectly intact.The Conversation

Beth Lord, Professor of Philosophy, University of Aberdeen and Alexander Douglas, Lecturer in Philosophy, University of St Andrews

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

 

CFA: 7th Finnish-Hungarian Seminar in Early Modern Philosophy

Call for Abstracts

The Seventh Finnish-Hungarian Seminar in Early Modern Philosophy

CEU, Budapest Campus

18–19 May 2020

Submission deadline: March 2

In a joint effort by philosophers in Finland and Hungary, the Seminar was founded to promote international cooperation among scholars of seventeenth and eighteenth-century philosophy. The previous meeting was held in 2019 in Helsinki. This will be the seventh meeting in a continuing series of seminars; for more information, please see the website https://fhsemp.wordpress.com/

We invite prospective participants to send an anonymized abstract of about 500 words in .pdf format on any topic in early modern philosophy to fhsemp2020@gmail.com no later than the 2nd of March. Please, indicate your name, university affiliation, and the title of your paper in the body of your email message.

Completed papers should aim at a reading time of 40 minutes or less. Please note that FHSEMP cannot provide funding for travel or accommodation.

For further information, please contact Mike Griffin at fhsemp2020@gmail.com

Organizing and program committee:

Mike Griffin (CEU), Vili Lähteenmäki (Helsinki), Judit Szalai (ELTE), and Valtteri Viljanen (Turku)

 

 

Alexandre Matheron

Alexandre Matheron died on January 7, 2020.

His two great books, Individu et communauté chez Spinoza (Paris: Éditions de Minuit, 1969) and Le Christ et le salut des ignorants chez Spinoza (Paris: Éditions Aubier-Montaigne, 1971), plus his many articles, recently gathered in Études sur Spinoza et les philosophies à l’âge classique (Lyon: ENS Éditions, 2011), earned him a reputation as a master of seventeenth-century studies in France and internationally. He was, after Martial Gueroult, one of the best representatives of the structural method in the history of philosophy. His seminars gathered both French and foreign undergraduate and graduate students desiring to learn this method. Through his teaching at the École Normale Supérieure de Fontenay/Saint-Cloud he formed, directly and indirectly, a great number of Spinozists. He always encouraged young researchers and was always ready to listen to suggestions different from his own.

In 1977, he was among the founders of the Association des Amis de Spinoza of which he became the chair after the death of Jean-Toussaint Desanti. These last years, illness kept him away from active participation, but he always continued to support, through his reading and comments, the forthcoming new edition of the complete works of Spinoza.

  • Pierre-François Moreau, via Mogens Laerke