CFP: Scottish Seminar in Early Modern Philosophy XI

7-8 May 2020, French Institute/Institut Français, Edinburgh.

 

Keynote speakers:

Alix Cohen (University of Edinburgh)

Philip​pe Hamou (University of Paris X-Nanterre)

 

SSEMP XI is the eleventh edition of a yearly international workshop that brings together established scholars, young researchers and advanced graduate students working in the field of Early Modern Philosophy. SSEMP welcomes papers on any topic in early modern philosophy (broadly defined to mean pre-Kantian philosophy ranging from late Renaissance philosophy to the early Enlightenment). We encourage proposals which consider early modern philosophy in relation to related disciplines, such as theology, the history of literature, intellectual history and the history of science. Since the 2020 edition of the SSEMP takes place at the Institut Français at St. Giles, this year we welcome in particular contributions concerned with relations between Scottish and French philosophy. The SSEMP makes an effort to ensure a reasonable gender balance.

Submissions for the regular program should include a 300-word abstract + contact information gathered in A SINGLE PDF-FILE named: “your-surname.your-brief-title.abstract.pdf” (e.g. “smith.spinoza-and-essences.abstract.pdf’). Do not blind submissions. Graduate students submitting to the regular program should include contact information for one referee (typically the supervisor.) NB: BLINDED OR INCORRECTLY NAMED SUBMISSIONS WILL NOT BE REGISTERED. Deadline for submission of abstracts is 15 January 2020. They should be sent by email to Mogens Lærke on mogenslaerke@hotmail.com. Due to very high numbers of submissions we cannot undertake to provide individual answers to all of them. Applicants who have not been contacted by 15 February should consider their submission declined.

The SSEMP awards a Graduate Student Essay Prize which this year, as in previous years, is funded by The British Society for the History of Philosophy (BSHP). The prize includes an invitation to present the essay at the SSEMP and a bursary of £300 toward travel and accommodation. The bursary cannot be used for any other purpose. Submissions to the essay competition should include: (1) Name, affiliation, name and email of supervisor, and personal contact information; (2) the complete essay (max. 6000 words, including notes). Everything, including contact information should be gathered in a single pdf-file entitled as follows: “your-surname.your-brief-title.essay.pdf” (e.g “jones.hume-on-habit.essay.pdf”). Do not blind submissions. NB: BLINDED OR INCORRECTLY NAMED SUBMISSIONS WILL NOT BE REGISTERED. Deadline for submissions is 15 January 2020. They should be sent by email to Mogens Lærke on mogenslaerke@hotmail.com. Those who wish to submit a proposal both as a complete text for the essay competition and as a short abstract for the regular program are free to do so.

Please note that the SSEMP cannot provide funding for travel or accommodation for speakers. We do, however, hope to be able to offer sandwich lunches and a conference dinner. Participants should expect two full conference days on 7-8 May.

 

Organisers:

Jonathan Cottrell (University of Edinburgh): j.cottrell@ed.ac.uk

Mogens Lærke (Maison Française d’Oxford): mogenslaerke@hotmail.com

 

Sponsors:

Institut Français, Edinburgh

Philosophy Department, Edinburgh University

Maison Française d’Oxford (MFO)

Scottish Philosophical Association (SPA)

British Society for the History of Philosophy (BSHP)

 

London Spinoza Circle Graduate Workshop on 21st November 2019

The London Spinoza Circle Graduate Workshop takes place on Thursday 21st November 2019 from 9:45am to 5:00pm at Birkbeck College, University of London, Dreyfus Room, 26 Russell Square, London WC1B 5DQ.

Programme

9.45 – 10.00:      Welcome

10.00 – 10.30:    Weak Individuals: A Spinozist Perspective – Emanuele Costa, (Birkbeck College and Johns Hopkins University):

10.30 – 11.00   Discussion

 

11.00 – 11.30:     The Second Kind of Knowledge and the Activity of the Ethics – Andrea Ray (University of Chicago)

11.30 – 12.00     Discussion

 

12.00 – 12.30      ‘The Whole Earth is Full of His Glory’: Amor Dei Intellectualis

as Gloria in Ethics V – John Heyderman – (Birkbeck College)

12.30 – 1.00       Discussion

 

1.00 – 2.00          LUNCH BREAK

 

2.00 – 2.30           Hegel and Spinoza on Freedom – Jason Yonover (Johns Hopkins University)

2.30 – 3.00           Discussion

 

3.00 – 3.30           On Laws, Human Nature and Beings of Reason in Spinoza – Kasper Kristensen, Uppsala University

3.30 – 4.00           Discussion

 

4.00 – 4.30           Identity, Agreement and ‘Othering’: Spinoza’s Politics of Recognition –  Steph Marston (Birkbeck College)

4.30 – 5.00       Discussion

 

The full programme including abstracts can be found on the London Spinoza Circle site here.

All are welcome and no registration is required.

Barnaby Hutchins and Ursula Renz at the London Spinoza Circle on 10th October 2019

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At our meeting on Thursday 10th October 2019, 3.00 – 5.00pm, we are very pleased to have Barnaby Hutchins (Ghent University) and Ursula Renz, (University of Klagenfurt) who will speak on

Spinoza on Human Subjectivity and the Notion of God’s Intellect
Birkbeck, University of London, Dreyfus Room, 26 Russell Square, London WC1B 5DQ

 

Abstract:

Spinoza’s Ethics is frequently interpreted, especially in recent scholarship, as maintaining that everything, including human subjects, is grounded in God or substance – that substance is the sole fundamental feature of reality. At the same time, the perspective of finite minds seems to play a non-trivial role in the constitution of reality. How can this (seeming) tension between these two positions be reconciled? In our paper, we argue for three claims: (1) both positions are necessary for Spinoza’s metaphysics, but neither is reducible to the other; (2) to account for both of them, given their mutual irreducibility, subjectivity itself must be comprehended as a function of finite beings; (3) the notion of infinite intellect plays a transcendental-philosophical role, and is not a metaphysical description of the nature of God. Through the elaboration of these three claims, we propose a new picture of Spinoza’s metaphysics, according to which human subjectivity is an integral, irreducible, and ineliminable – and thereby fundamental – feature of reality.

All welcome and no registration required.

Symposium: Spinoza and the arts: passionate reason

A 2-day international symposium, 4-5 October 2019
At West Den Haag art gallery, the Hague, the Netherlands

Featuring papers and discussion from Moira Gatens, Beth Lord, Katja Diefenbach, Mogens Laerke, Andrea Sangiacomo, and Torkild Thanem, moderated by Baruch Gottlieb.

Full information and registration available here

PDF with programme, paper abstracts, and further information here: Spinoza-Symposium-2019-final

CFP: Journal special issue on “Spinoza today”

The editorial committee of the Italian philosophical Journal INCIRCOLO – RIVISTA DI FILOSOFIA E CULTURE (http://www.incircolorivistafilosofica.it) kindly invites authors to submit their papers to the upcoming issue 8/2019, which will be dedicated to:

“SPINOZA TODAY”

*SUBMISSION DEADLINE: NOVEMBER 15TH, 2019*

Our times seem to owe much to Spinoza’s thought. Several traces of such debt can be found in the contemporary philosophical debate, where words, concepts and objects typical of Spinoza’s philosophy are constantly reused and further examined. The well-known sentence by Bergson, according to which every philosopher has in truth two systems, her own and that of Spinoza, may shed an interesting light on the current philosophical debate indeed. This is why we propose to reflect on “Spinoza today”.

If it is possible to depict Spinoza’s thought as a sphinx sitting at the entrance of the main road that led to modernity, its critical reprise on the threshold of a new modernity which has to face profound and disquieting technological, environmental, social and political issues requires to be deeply analysed.

Authors interested in presenting a contribution to this issue may discuss, among others, the following questions:

–   may a critical reprise of the Spinozian approach help contemporary philosophy to overcome the general disorientation deriving from nihilistic positions, relativistic views and the feeble suggestions of so-called post-modernism?

–   How the several versions of immanentism recently elaborated can be fruitfully confronted with the classical position of Spinozism?

–   Is there, in the current philosophical scenario, a particular approach that may be considered the rightful heir of Spinozism? Is contemporary materialism a suitable candidate for this title or does it fail to meet the necessary requirements, so that it needs to be adequately integrated, perhaps with elements that belong to this same philosophical tradition?

–   May contemporary political philosophy benefit from an approach that strives to balance the respect of individual freedom and the necessary constraints of political institutions, as Spinoza suggested?

–   From the perspective of philosophy of history, may Spinoza’s rational understanding of historical events as rings of a chain held together by necessary joints represent a valuable and still insightful position?

*SUBMISSION DEADLINE: NOVEMBER 15, 2019*

Contributions should not exceed the maximum length of 9000 WORDS (references, notes, 250-words abstract and 4-5 keywords included) and should be written in ENGLISH or ITALIAN. All submissions will undergo blind peer-review.

Please send your paper by e-mail to redazioneincircolo@gmail.com.

 

Fabio Fossa, Ph.D.

Dipartimento di Filosofia e Scienze dell’Educazione Università di Torino

Dipartimento di Informatica

Università di Pisa

Washington Spinoza Society

The 19th season of the Washington Spinoza Society will officially begin on Monday, September 9th at 6:30 p.m at the BCC Regional Services Center, 4805 Edgemoor Lane, Bethesda, MD, Conference Room Norfolk (C).

The presenter will be Professor Yitzhak Melamed (Johns Hopkins University), speaking on “Spinoza’s ‘Atheism.’”  In this paper, Professor Melamed will attempt to show that the only sense in which Spinoza can be genuinely considered an atheist is one that is not particularly informative.

All welcome.

6th Finnish-Hungarian Seminar in Early Modern Philosophy

6th Finnish-Hungarian Seminar in Early Modern Philosophy https://fhsemp.wordpress.com<https://fhsemp.wordpress.com/>

6–7 June 2019

University of Helsinki

Main building, hall 8

 

Thursday June 6

9:15:Opening

9:30:Jack Stetter (Paris 8) Spinoza on Stupidity: The Power of False Ideas and Persistent Ignorance

11:00:Ericka Tucker (Marquette University) Hobbes and Spinoza on Conatus

13:30:Jessica Tizzard (University of Connecticut) Why does Kant Think We Must Believe in the Immortal Soul?

15:00:Jen Nguyen (Harvard) Leibniz on Distance

16:15:Zachary Agoff (San Francisco State University) A Metaphysical Method for Moral Development: Descartes and Elisabeth on Morally Relevant Knowledge

 

Friday June 7

9:30:Kevin R. Busch (Davidson College) Hume on the Origin and Limits of Thought

11:00:Timo Kaitaro (University of Helsinki) Hume and the Artificial Structures of the Human Mind

13:30:Nicholas Vallone (University of Wisconsin-Madison) Locke’s Theory of Memory

15:00:Matthew Leisinger (Cambridge) Cudworth on Freewill

16:30:Invited speaker Alison Simmons (Harvard) New Narratives in Early Modern Philosophy: The Road Ahead

 

 

Attendance is free and everyone is warmly welcome. Please write us so we can take your participation into consideration with practicalities: fhsemp2019@gmail.com<mailto:fhsemp2019@gmail.com>

The venue is the main building of University of Helsinki, lecture hall 8 on the third floor (Fabianinkatu 33, 00100 Helsinki).Professor Simmons’s talk will take place at Tiedekulma(Think Corner at Yliopistonkatu 4) right next to the main building.

 

Vili Lähteenmäki

Academy of Finland Research Fellow

University of Helsinki

https://helsinki.academia.edu/ViliLahteenmaki

 

Edwin Curley at the London Spinoza Circle: 2nd May 2019

At the meeting of the London Spinoza Circle on Thursday 2nd May, 3.00 – 5.00pm, Prof. curleyEdwin Curley (University of Michigan) will speak on:

Making Sense of Spinoza’s Metaphysics

Birkbeck, University of London, Dreyfus Room, 26 Russell Square, London WC1B 5DQ

Abstract

In this talk I shall revisit number of central themes in Spinoza’s metaphysics including the principle of charity, the difficulties associated with predicative interpretations of the mode-substance relation, the reason for adopting an interpretation that emphasises the laws of nature, and the roots of Spinoza’s theory of laws in Cartesian philosophy of science. My presentation will draw on two recent papers, ‘Spinoza’s Metaphysics Revisited’ and ‘Laws of Nature in Spinoza’.

 

A presentation of the paper ‘Spinoza’s Metaphysics Revisited’ is available here.

 

All welcome and no registration is required.

Edwin Curley lecture, London

Edwin Curley on “Spinoza, the Enlightenment, and Religious Liberty”
Monday 29 April 2019
Conway Hall, London
World-renowned philosopher, Edwin Curley, brings Baruch Spinoza’s ideas on religious toleration to life.
Details and booking on Eventbrite.

 

What can Baruch Spinoza (1632-1677) teach us about how to manage the ferocious divisions of identity, culture, ideology, and faith that riddle our politics today?

Come join us this April 29th to hear distinguished Professor, Edwin Curley’s answer. Curley is an Emeritus Professor of Philosophy at the University of Michigan, and one of the world’s foremost experts on the life and thought of Spinoza. He has just recently published the second volume of a complete translation of Spinoza’s works with Princeton University Press.

This is a public lecture, with free entrance, supported by the Centre for Ethics, Philosophy, and Public Affairs (CEPPA), at the University of St Andrews, as well as by the Royal Institute of Philosophy.

Spaces are limited so do book a ticket in advance.

This event is organized by Alexander Douglas (Philosophy, St Andrews) & Adam Etinson (Philosophy, St Andrews).

Note: the lecture will take place in the Brockway Room.