The Arts of Spinoza: extended deadline

EXTENDED DEADLINE for submissions for “The Arts of Spinoza + Pacific Spinoza” conference, Auckland, 26-28 May 2017:

Abstracts will now be accepted up to Tuesday 14 February, midnight NZST. Send to pacificspinoza@gmail.com. Abstracts submitted by this date will receive a decision around the second half of March or sooner. (Those who have already submitted abstracts, thank you — decisions will be sent out for these by late February or latest early March.)

Full details at: http://interstices.ac.nz/call-for-papers-spinoza-auckland-2017/

Oxford Seminar in Early Modern Philosophy

Oxford Seminar in Early Modern Philosophy: Philosophy of/and Education

Mon 13-Tues 14 March, 2017

Mansfield College

Oxford, OX1 3TF

 

Attendance is free and all are welcome, but we ask that you register by emailing: paul.lodge@mansfield.ox.ac.uk

In addition, there is a conference dinner (£25) on Mon 13th, for which registration and prepayment is required.

 

Monday March 13

9.00-9.30 – Registration and coffee

9.30-10.30 ‘Spinozan Pedagogy.’  Julie Klein (Villanova University)

10.30-11.30  ‘Locke on Habit and Experience in the Formation of the Self.’ Anik Waldow (University of Sydney)

11.30-12.00 – Break

12.00-1.00 ‘Domesticating Descartes: Johann Clauberg’s Scholasticization of the New Science.’  Nabeel Hamid (University of Pennsylvania)

1.00-2.30 – LUNCH

2.30-3.30  ‘Adam Smith’s Remarks on Education.’  Anna Markwart (Nicolaus Copernicus University in Toruń)

3.30-4.30 ‘Music as Moral Authenticity: Reinstating the Role of Music in Rousseau’s Philosophy of Education.’ Valerie Kuzmina (University of Ottawa)

4.30-5.00 – Break

5.00-6.00 ‘Emilie Du Châtelet on Education and Women’s Minds.’ Karen Detlefsen (University of Pennsylvania)

 

Tuesday March 14

9.00-9.30 — Coffee

9.30-10.30 ‘Going to School with Luther: 18th–Century German Philosophical Conceptions of the Modern University and Their Lutheran Heritage.’ Lim Lung Chieh (University of Ottawa)

10.30-11.30 ‘The Socratic Pedagogy of Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz.’ Sergio A. Gallegos (Metropolitan St. University of Denver) & Adriana Clavel (University of Sheffield)

11.30-12.00 – Break

12.00-1.00 ‘”For the Want Whereof This Nation Perishes”: John Milton on Education.’ Teresa Bejan (University of Oxford)

Lunch – 1.00-2.30

2.30-3.30 ‘Shifting Epistemic Authority and the Role of Education.’ Lisa Shapiro (Simon Fraser University)

Spinoza Colloquium, Leipzig

Spinoza Colloquium Leipzig

Friday February 17th, 2017, 2 to 8 pm

Whoever happens to be in the area: At Leipzig University there will be a fifth session of the Spinoza Colloquium. This activity is a cooperative project between the political science department at Leipzig and the philosophy department at Halle-Wittenberg (and with support from the German Spinoza Society).

This event will again take place at the Institut für Politikwissenschaft, Geisteswissenschaftliches Zentrum (GWZ), Beethovenstraße 15, 04107 Leipzig, room 4.1.16.

There will be three talks:

Dr. Kerstin Andermann (Lüneburg): „Spinozas Theorie der Gemeinbegriffe“
Marion Blancher (Lyon): “Individual Freedom and Common Freedom in the Political Theory of Spinoza”
Prof. Katja Diefenbach (Stuttgart/Berlin): „Spinoza oder Descartes? Die Kontroverse zwischen Ferdinand Alquié und Martial Gueroult und ihre Nachwirkungen in der poststrukturalistischen Philosophie“

For more info go to: http://www.sozphil.uni-leipzig.de/cm/powi/martin-saar/

Contact: Martin Saar martin.saar@uni-leipzig.de

New book: Spinoza: the Ethics of an Outlaw

A blurb from the publisher follows.

Spinoza: The Ethics of an Outlaw

By Ivan Segré

Translated by David Broder

Spinoza is among the most controversial and asymmetrical thinkers in the tradition and history of modern European philosophy. Since the 17th century, his work has aroused some of the fiercest and most intense polemics in the discipline. From his expulsion from the synagogue and onwards, Spinoza has never ceased to embody the secular, heretical and self-loathing Jew. Ivan Segré, a philosopher and celebrated scholar of the Talmud, discloses the conservative underpinnings that have animated Spinoza’s numerable critics and antagonists.

Through a close reading of Leo Strauss and several contemporary Jewish thinkers, such as Jean-Claude Milner and Benny Levy (Sartre’s last secretary), Spinoza: the Ethics of an Outlaw aptly delineates the common cause of Spinoza’s contemporary censors: an explicit hatred of reason and its emancipatory potential. Spinoza’s radical heresy lies in his rejection of any and all blind adherence to Biblical Law, and in his plea for the freedom and autonomy of thought. Segré reclaims Spinoza as a faithful interpreter of the revolutionary potential contained within the Old Testament.

For further information please click here.

 

Scottish Seminar in Early Modern Philosophy VIII (SSEMP VIII)

University of Edinburgh 10-11 April 2017

Project Room, room 1.06, William Robertson Building
University of Edinburgh, 50 George Square
Edinburgh, EH8 9LH

Key note speakers:
Beth Lord
(University of Aberdeen)
Peter Millican (Oxford University)

Full programme available here

Attendance is free, but registration is required.

Contact: Mogens Lærke: mogenslaerke@hotmail.com

Organisation: Pauline Phemister (Edinburgh), Mogens Lærke (IHRIM, CNRS, ENS de Lyon)

Funding: Scottish Philosophical Association (SPA) / British Society for the History of Philosophy (BSHP)/ Edinburgh University / IHRIM (CNRS, UMR 5317), ENS de Lyon.

Spinoza Circle meeting (London)

For the next meeting of the London Spinoza Circle, we are pleased to have Eric Schliesser (University of Amsterdam) who will speak on “Spinoza and 18th Century Anti-mathematicism.”

3pm – 5pm, Wednesday 25th January 2017 at

Birkbeck, University of London, School of Arts, Room B02, 43 Gordon Square, Kings Cross, London WC1H 0PD.

In this presentation, I identify and articulate three different kinds of critical attitudes toward the epistemic status and application of mathematics that were developed in the eighteenth century. Somewhat surprisingly, I suggest that all three of these can be found in the works of Spinoza and, paradoxically, were further developed in light of Spinoza’s own reliance on a geometric mode of presentation. In addition to the writings of Spinoza, I pay particular attention to works by Mandeville, Hume, and Buffon.

 The following meeting of the London Spinoza Circle will be on Friday 10th March, 3pm – 5pm when Julie Klein (Villanova University) will speak on “Language, Reason, and Intellect in Spinoza” (location to be confirmed).

.

Seminar: “Meeting Spinoza”

Seminar: ‘Meeting Spinoza: Books, Letters, Networks, Personal Encounters’

Date: October 5-6, 2017

Location: Utrecht, The Netherlands

Confirmed invited speakers: Mogens Laerke (CNRS Lyon), Steven Nadler (Madison-Wisconsin), Antonella del Prete (Tuscia University)

Prospectus

While the old model of Spinoza as a recluse who developed a complete philosophical system in near isolation may no longer dominate scholarship as it once did, the full depth of his interaction with others remains largely unexplored. The seminar ‘Meeting Spinoza: Books, Letters, Networks, Personal Encounters’ seeks to fill this historiographical gap by bringing Spinoza specialists together with other early modern scholars who encounter him through the eyes of the historical figures at the basis of their own research. With the notion of ‘meeting’ in the main title we understand direct engagement with Spinoza during his own lifetime. Nevertheless, as the subtitle conveys, the modality of these meetings may be understood in a wide variety of ways. Papers may therefore consider the reception of Spinoza’s writings, either as they circulated in manuscript form or immediately upon their publication. They may seek to solve specific issues relating to Spinoza’s correspondence, or investigate patterns in his letter writing. We also encourage contributions on the networks in which Spinoza participated, ranging from the Jewish surroundings in which he was raised, to his ambivalent relationship with the Dutch Cartesians, and everything in between, such as the Dutch Collegiant community of his merchant years or even the prominent number of physicians figuring among his associates. A final, related area of interest is constituted by those contemporaries who are known to have met Spinoza in person. This category includes the famous meetings with Henry Oldenburg and Leibniz, but our interest extends also to chance or one-time encounters with lesser known figures, such as the Leiden theologian Salomon van Til. Papers should aim to contribute to our understanding of the man Spinoza, the development of his thought, and the response it evoked, all within the dynamics of the world in which he participated.

Abstracts

Anonymized abstracts (300-500 words) should be sent as a .docx file to Albert Gootjes (a.j.gootjes@uu.nl) by March 15, 2017; please include a separate attachment with contact information, affiliation, and professional status. Applicants will be notified of the committee’s decision by April 15, 2017.

Limited funds are available to cover travel and/or accommodations for presenters who receive no financial support from their institution. Please indicate in your cover letter if you would like to be considered for such a subsidy.

‘Spinoza’s Web’

This seminar is part of the ‘Spinoza’s Web’-projected directed by prof. dr. Piet Steenbakkers, and funded by the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO).

Organisers: Piet Steenbakkers, Jeroen van de Ven, Albert Gootjes

The Spinoza Web

This is quite an amazing resource for all things Spinoza!

 

On 27 November 2016 a website on the Dutch philosopher Benedictus de Spinoza (1632-1677) was launched by a research team based out of Utrecht University’s Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies. ‘The Spinoza Web’ is an open-access website that seeks to make Spinoza’s life, thought, and networks accessible to a wide range of users from interested novices to advanced scholars.

The beta release notably features a ‘Timeline Experience’, which tells the story of Spinoza using rich graphic and other supporting material. The ‘Database Search’ is a gateway to an enormous repository for the study of Spinoza. The goal is eventually to assemble all first-hand documentation pertaining to the philosopher for the use of the worldwide scholarly community.

The team collaborated with a commercial partner (Rotterdam-based advertising agency Nijgh) to produce an attractive website that meets scholarly standards. With the current design, it hopes to work towards a model for websites on historical figures.

The website has been constructed as part of the larger ‘Spinoza’s Web’ project, funded by the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO). The team consists of Prof. Piet Steenbakkers as principal investigator, with Jeroen van de Ven and Albert Gootjes as postdoctoral researchers.

 

New book on Spinoza and Education

Spinoza and Education: Freedom, understanding and empowerment

by Dr. Johan Dahlbeck

Spinoza and Education offers a comprehensive investigation into the educational implications of Spinoza’s moral theory. Taking Spinoza’s naturalism as its point of departure, it constructs a considered account of education, taking special care to investigate the educational implications of Spinoza’s psychological egoism. What emerges is a counterintuitive form of education grounded in the egoistic striving of the teacher to persevere and to flourish in existence while still catering to the ethical demands of the students and the greater community.

In providing an educational reading of Spinoza’s moral theory, this book sets up a critical dialogue between educational theory and recent studies which highlight the centrality of ethics in Spinoza’s overall philosophy. By placing his work in a contemporary educational context, chapters explore a counterintuitive conception of education as an ethical project, aimed at overcoming the desire to seek short-term satisfaction and troubling the influential concept of the student as consumer. This book also considers how education, from a Spinozistic point of view, may be approached in terms of a kind of cognitive therapy serving to further a more scientifically adequate understanding of the world and aimed at combating prejudices and superstition.

Spinoza and Education demonstrates that Spinoza’s moral theory can further an educational ideal, where notions of freedom and self-preservation provide the conceptual core of a coherent philosophy of education. As such, it will appeal to researchers, academics and postgraduate students in the fields of philosophy of education, theory of education, critical thinking, philosophy, ethics, and Spinoza studies.

 

More information from:

https://www.routledge.com/Spinoza-and-Education-Freedom-understanding-and-empowerment/Dahlbeck/p/book/9781138931817