Fourth Finnish-Hungarian Seminar in Early Modern Philosophy

29–30 May 2017

University of Turku

Artium, Seminar Hall Hovi V105 (Kaivokatu 12, Turku)

 

Monday, 29 May

9.30 Lloyd Strickland (Manchester Metropolitan): The Fourth Hypothesis on the Union of Soul and Body

10.30 Martin Benson (Stony Brook): The Power of Affectivity: The Ground of the Good in Spinoza’s Ethics

11.30 Daniel Fogal (Uppsala): Descartes and the Possibility of Enlightened Freedom

13.30 Laetitia Ramelet (Lausanne): Pufendorf’s Solution to the Puzzle of Consent and Natural Law

15.00 Martin Pickup (Oxford): The Infinity of Analysis and Leibniz’s Problems of Proof

16.00 Mike Griffin (CEU): Leibniz on Infinite Analysis

 

Tuesday, 30 May

9.30 Ville Paukkonen (Helsinki): Berkeley’s Theory of Agent Causation: Finite and Infinite Agents and the Question of Necessary Connections

10.30 Julia Jorati (Ohio State): Emilie du Châtelet’s Agent-Causal Compatibilist Theory of Freedom

11.30 Ramona Winter (HU Berlin/Yale): Hume’s Concept of an (Embodied) Self

13.30 Jani Hakkarainen (Tampere) & Todd Ryan (Trinity College): Hume on Possible Duration without Possible Temporal Parts

15.00 Sebastian Bender (HU Berlin) & Till Hoeppner (Potsdam): Leibniz and Kant on Representations and Minds

16.00 Dai Heide (Simon Fraser): A Mereological Argument for the Non-Spatiotemporality of Things in Themselves

 

The Organizing Committee

Valtteri Viljanen<http://users.utu.fi/valvil/> (Turku) Mike Griffin<http://philosophy.ceu.edu/node/17> (CEU) Vili Lähteenmäki<http://helsinki.academia.edu/ViliLahteenmaki> (Helsinki) Judit Szalai<http://www.btk.elte.hu/dynpage6.exe?f=btke&p1=m%3AFomenuH%2CEntryF2&p3=x%3AFomenuV2%2CEntry2S2&p4=p%3A8210&per=CMPER-1081> (ELTE)

 

https://fhsemp.wordpress.com/

 

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Spinoza and Modern Jewish Philosophy conference

Spinoza and Modern Jewish Philosophy

University of Washington (Seattle)

May 21-22, 2017

 

Sunday, May 21st

UW Hillel, 4745 17th Ave NE, Seattle, WA 98105

 

12:45pm Welcome and Opening Remarks Michael A. Rosenthal (University of Washington)

1-3pm — Panel 1 (UW Hillel): Spinoza in the 17th Century

Spinoza on the Divinity of Scripture: Steven Nadler (University of Wisconsin, Madison)

Spinoza, His Family, and the Revolts against Philip II and the Inquisition: Jonathan Israel (Institute for Advanced Studies)

3:15-5:15pm –Panel 2 (UW Hillel): Spinoza, the Jewish Enlightenment, and German Radicals Session

Activity and Suspension: German-Jewish Spinozists Respond to Hegel: Tracie Matysik (University of Texas)

The Study of Scripture and the Study of Nature: Michah Gottlieb (New York University)

Solomon Maimon on Spinoza, Mendelssohn, and the Maskilim: Abraham Socher (Oberlin College)

7:00pm — Stroum Lecture featuring Prof. Jonathan Israel (Kane Hall, room 220): In What Sense Was Spinoza a Revolutionary Thinker?

 

Monday, May 22nd

Husky Union Building, 4001 E Stevens Way NE, Seattle, WA 98195

 

9am-11am — Panel 3 (HUB, room 334): Spinoza and Jewish Politics

The Prophets at War:  Hermann Cohen on Spinoza and the Moral Basis of Citizenship:  Michael A. Rosenthal (University of Washington)

Particularism and Universalism Revisited: Spinoza, Leon Roth, and the Category of “Jewish Philosophy”: Leora Batnitzky (Princeton University)

The Zionist Critique of Spinoza’s Politics: Julie E. Cooper (Tel Aviv University)

LUNCH BREAK

1-3pm – Panel 4 (HUB, room 334): Spinoza, the Emotions, and Kabbalah

Spinoza and Freud on Bodies, Images, and Affects: Julie R. Klein (Villanova University)

The Greatest Thing You’ll Ever Learn: Debating Spinoza over Loving God and Being Loved in Return: Benjamin Pollock (Hebrew University)

Spinoza, Platonism, and Some Jewish Thinkers: Michael Morgan (University of Toronto and Indiana University)

3:30-5:30pm – Panel 5 (HUB, room 334): Spinoza and Modernity

Spinoza on the Election of the Hebrews: Yitzhak Melamed (Johns Hopkins University)

The Hyphen in the Theological-Political:  Spinoza to Mendelssohn, Heine and Derrida: Willi Goetschel (University of Toronto)

Toward a History of Jewish Anti-Spinozism: Daniel Schwartz (George Washington University)

 

Tuesday, May 23rd

7:00pm — Stroum Lecture featuring Prof. Jonathan Israel (Kane Hall, room 220): Jewish Emancipation and the Radical Enlightenment

 

For registration for both the conference and the Stroum Lectures, see the webpage: http://jewishstudies.washington.edu/spinoza-modern-jewish-philosophy/.

 

For further information on the schedule, see the webpage: http://jewishstudies.washington.edu/spinoza-modern-jewish-philosophy/conference-schedule/

 

For further information on the participants, see the webpage: http://jewishstudies.washington.edu/spinoza-modern-jewish-philosophy/speakers/

 

If you have any other questions regarding logistics, please contact the Stroum Center for Jewish Studies: http://jewishstudies.washington.edu/

The Conference has been supported by The Stroum Center for Jewish Studies, The Simpson Center for the Humanities, and the Departments of Philosophy and Germanics at the University of Washington.

Spinoza and Aesthetics conference

SPINOZA & AESTHETICS/SPACE
Friday April 21, 2017

INTRODUCTION | JB Shank | University of Minnesota 11:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

WORKSHOP I | Arun Saldanha | University of Minnesota: Spinoza’s Geography of Bodies: Global Capitalism and the Responsibility to Revolt
Respondents| Harshit Rathi + Joseph Bermas-Dawes  11:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.

LUNCH BREAK 1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.

WORKSHOP II | Peg Rawes| University College London: Dissimilarity: Spinoza’s Ethical Ratios and Housing Welfare. Respondents| Anjali Ganapathy + Austin Young  2:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

COFFEE BREAK 3:30 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

WORKSHOP III | Susan Ruddick| University of Toronto: A/Synchronic Earth: Spinoza and the Spatial Aesthetic of the Anthropocene. Respondents| Kai Bosworth + Lindsey Weber   4:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

135 Nicholson Hall | University of Minnesota

For information: Cesare Casarino: casarino@umn.edu, Anjali Ganapathy: ganap002@umn.edu
Co-sponsored by the Consortium for the Study of the Premodern World; the Department of Cultural Studies and Comparative Literature; the Department of Architecture

Spinoza: Reason, Religion, and Politics conference

SPINOZA: REASON, RELIGION AND POLITICS
The relation between the Ethics and the Theological-Political Treatise

Princeton University
Department of Philosophy
May 5-7, 2017

Friday, May 5
9:30AM: Piet Steenbakkers (Utrecht University): Parallel Masterpieces: Intertextuality in Spinoza’s Ethica and Tractatus theologico-politicus

10 :30AM : Pierre-François Moreau (ENS-Lyon): The Metaphysics of the Tractatus Theologico-politicus

11:30AM: Mogens Laerke (CNRS and ENS-Lyon): Common Notions in Ethics and the TTP

12:30-1:30PM: Lunch

1:30PM: E.M. Curley (University of Michigan): Laws of Nature in the Ethics and the TTP

2:30PM: Emanuela Scribano (Università Ca’Foscari, Venice): Miracles and Finalism. From the TTP to Ethics

3:30PM: Kristin Primus (University of California, Berkeley): On Certain Adventitious Ideas: Revelation and Intuition

4:30-5:00PM: Coffee

5:00PM: Donald Rutherford (University of California, San Diego): The Ethics of the Theological-Political Treatise

6:00PM: Steven Nadler (University of Wisconsin, Madison): The Ethics as a Theological-Political Treatise

Saturday, May 6
9:30AM: Jonathan Israel (Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton): Where is the collective morality in Spinoza’s ethics? Connecting Spinoza’s ‘Ethics’ Part Five to his Political Philosophy

10:30AM: Andrea Sangiacomo (University of Groningen): Is wonder a remedy against the passions? Spinoza’s struggling with Descartes’ legacy in the Theological-Political Treatise and in the Ethics

11:30AM: Michael Rosenthal (University of Washington): Sovereign Decisions: The Will and the Law in the Ethics and the TTP

12:30-1:30PM: Lunch

1:30PM: Theo Verbeek (University of Utrecht): Divine Law in the TTP and Ethics

2:30PM: Oded Schechter (University of Hamburg): Obedience and Revelation in the TTP and in Spinoza’s mature philosophy (Ethics and TP)

3:30-4:00PM: Coffee

4:00PM: Pina Totaro (ILIESI and University of Rome “La Sapienza”): Littera and Spiritus: On the Relationship between the Tractatus Theologico-politicus and the Ethics

5:00PM: Julie Klein (Villanova University): Knowers and Learners: Spinozan Pedagogy
Sunday, May 7
10:00AM: Yitzhak Melamed (Johns Hopkins University): Spinoza’s ‘Atheism’

11:00AM: Daniel Garber (Princeton University): Spinoza’s Many Gods

12:00: PM: Russ Leo (Princeton University): Thomas Hobbes, the English Restoration, and the International Audience for Spinoza’s Tractatus Theologico-Politicus

All sessions of the conference will be held in Marx 301 on the campus of Princeton University.

This conference was organized by Daniel Garber, Mogens Laerke, Pierre-François Moreau, and Pina Totaro. The organizers would like to thank the Department of Philosophy at Princeton University, the Humanities Council of Princeton University, the Princeton University Center for Human Values, and the École Normale Supérieure of Lyon for their kind support.

For further information write Daniel Garber (dgarber@princeton.edu).

Collegium Spinozanum II

An International Summer School on Spinoza and Spinozisms in Their Historical and Philosophical Context

University of Groningen

Full details: http://www.rug.nl/education/summer-winter-schools/summer_schools_2017/collegium-spinozanum/

Dates
4 – 7 July 2017
Deadline call for papers: 20 April 2017
Deadline for registration: 1 June 2017
Level
BA, MA, PhD, Post-Doc (staff)
Coordinator
Andrea Sangiacomo
Fee
PhDs and Post-doc (or staff): 150
Undergraduate students: 100
Bachelor students: 50
Housing (optional):
235 (6 nights)
Spinoza

Built on the success of the previous 2015 edition, the Groningen Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Thought is pleased to announce the second edition of the Collegium Spinozanum, which will take place at the Faculty of Philosophy at the University of Groningen from 4 to 7 July 2017.

This Summer School aims to bring together advanced students and established scholars working broadly on Spinoza’s thought, sources and reception. The goal of the Summer School is to create an international forum to stimulate scholarly exchange and conversations inspired by different approaches and methodologies.

During morning sessions, established scholars in several different areas of Spinoza studies will offer seminars on some of the frontier research topics in the field. Afternoon sessions will consist of discussions of selected papers presented by participants and reading groups on short texts belonging to Spinoza’s works, or significant for the reception of Spinoza’s philosophy.

Scholarships and fee waivers are available.

Julie Klein at London Spinoza Circle

Julie Klein (Villanova University) will speak on “Language, Reason,and Intellect in Spinoza” on Friday 10th March, 2 – 4pm (Note change of time).

Dreyfus Room, via  26 Russell Square, Birkbeck College, London WC1B 5DT. The Dreyfus Room is on the top floor of the adjacent building.

“In this paper, I review Spinoza’s critique of language to show that he thinks words are inadequate for, and may even render us unable to pursue, scientia intuitiva.  Coming to terms with Spinoza’s division between language and intellection brings us face to face with a position that separates him from many recent thinkers: he does not take the linguistic turn.  Spinoza’s critique of language also raises a difficult question for us as readers: If words are inapt for intellectual knowing, what is the point of a text like the Ethics?  The TTP offers us three models of texts: Scripture, Euclid’s Elements, and “the true original text of Scripture,” which Spinoza identifies with the human mind.  I argue that the text of the Ethics is not Spinoza’s “philosophy” but rather points us toward it.  As linguistic and as rational, the Ethics offers cognitive training to strengthen the mind’s power of inference, but it does not present knowledge of the third kind.  This, I argue, is the sense of Spinoza’s claim in Ethics 5p28 that a striving or desire for the third kind of knowing can arise from the second kind of knowing and not the first.  In the final section of the paper, I explore the differences between the second and third kinds of knowing and focus on the break between the former and the latter.  I argue, ultimately, that the third kind of knowing is distinguished by its immediacy, which radically exceeds both the first and second kinds of knowing.”

Spinoza PhD Scholarships at Aberdeen

Elphinstone PhD scholarships are available at University of Aberdeen to work on the following projects:

  • Spinoza and German Idealism
  • Spinoza and the Philosophy of Time

Elphinstone scholarships cover full-time student fees and are open to students from anywhere in the world. Please note: no stipend for living costs is provided.

Deadline for applications: 31 March, 2017

For further information, see below, and this page: http://www.abdn.ac.uk/research/postgraduate-study/elphinstone-phd-scholarships-266.php#arts-and-social-sciences

Contact Dr. Beth Lord (s.b.lord@abdn.ac.uk) to express interest or discuss a research proposal.

 

Spinoza and German Idealism (supervised by Dr. Beth Lord)

The Philosophy Department at the University of Aberdeen welcomes project proposals on Benedict de Spinoza and German Idealism. Applicants may propose projects taking any direction within this broad theme, connecting Spinoza’s thought with that of any of the major German Idealist philosophers (Kant, Fichte, Schelling, Hegel), less-studied idealists (such as Maimon, Trendelenburg, and the German Romantics) or literary figures associated with this movement (such as Goethe and Coleridge). Projects might focus on the reception of Spinoza by German Idealists; monism, rational religion, intellectual intuition, and other concepts the idealists inherited from Spinoza; the Pantheism controversy; Hegel’s critique of Spinoza; idealist elements of Spinoza’s own metaphysics and philosophy of mind; continuities and discontinuities between Spinoza’s political thought and the political doctrines of Hegel and others; the idealist use of Spinoza in eighteenth-century literature; or the role of German idealism in twentieth-century French Spinozist thought. Applicants should already have a good background knowledge of Spinoza or the German Idealist thinker(s) on whom they wish to focus. Those interested in applying are strongly advised to contact the supervisor to discuss project ideas prior to applying.

 

Spinoza and the Philosophy of Time (supervised by Dr. Beth Lord and Dr. Stephan Torre)

The Philosophy Department at the University of Aberdeen welcomes project proposals on Benedict de Spinoza and the Philosophy of Time. Applicants may propose projects taking any direction within this broad theme, focusing either on Spinoza’s own philosophy of time, or on a comparative/critical study of Spinoza and historical and/or contemporary philosophers. For example, projects on Spinoza’s philosophy of time could engage with the metaphysics of the infinite and eternal; the temporality of consciousness; the relationship between space and time; problems of duration and eternity; the possibility of change in Spinoza’s metaphysics; the relationship between time and freedom; the interpretation of the past; the role of prophecy in religion and politics; time and the imagination; or Spinoza’s concept of history. Comparative projects could examine one or more aspects of Spinoza’s philosophy of time in light of problems and theories raised by, for example, Aristotle, Leibniz, Kant, Hegel, Nietzsche, Bergson, McTaggart, Heidegger, Deleuze, and/or any contemporary philosopher(s) of time. The supervisory team consists of a Spinoza specialist and a specialist in philosophy of time. Those interested in applying are strongly advised to contact one or both supervisors prior to applying.